Influx of Hotels Planned for Downtown Seattle

The Downtown Seattle metro area has not seen any hotels break ground in the past two years, and there are no current plans for any to go under construction in the next upcoming months. But according to the Seattle Times, all that might change this year, with current hotels having successful bookings, with little trouble filling rooms, and they’re able to have consistently higher rates. Developers are feeling more confident with those statistics in place, and are moving forward by proposing more hotels pop up in the downtown area.

Downtown Seattle Sheraton, photo courtesy of destination360.com

According to the Times, one of those proposals includes a hotel with 1,200+ rooms, which is larger than any hotel in the area except for the Seattle Sheraton hotel. If all of the projects presented were to be built, the Seattle hotel industry would increase by more than 15%! Developers like Touchstone, Kauri, and Daniels Development among others all have projects in various stages of planning for construction, and Seattleites looking for hotel living should keep an eye out for upcoming hotel projects that have apartment rentals planned into the space as well. For more information on upcoming projects in the Downtown Seattle area, visit the Seattle Times.

Vacationing Late Summer? Review Home Security Tips to Keep Your Residence Safe

Summer is prime time for vacationers to pack up and get in the car, and it’s smart to make sure your home is secured before leaving the humble abode for an extended weekend or longer. Zillow has compiled a precautionary checklist to review before leaving your home alone, and the first item on the list is to consider having a house sitter or consulting with your friends and neighbors to see if they’re able to check on the house while you’re gone, which could be simple if you’re having someone check on your pets, or water your plants.

It might be wise for a neighbor to park in front of your home while you’re away, creating the illusion that someone is home at all times. Shutting off a main valve might be a cautious step to take before you leave to avoid any pipes leaking, which can cause extensive damage, and become very costly. You could consider putting up motion sensor lights (check with your landlord to see if this is feasible) or electrical timers for inside lighting, again you could also have your neighbors stop by and do the same thing. For other tips on securing your home, visit Zillow.

Curious How the 99 Tunnel Will be constructed? See its Replica in Pioneer Square

Are you curious how that gigantic 99 tunnel is going to be sculpted? Me too! You can now go see the replica for yourself of the machine that is going to dig under downtown Seattle at Milepost 31, the viaduct museum in Pioneer Square. The replica is 10 feet long, making it 1/35th of the massive machine that will arrive in Seattle early next year. According to the Seattle Pi, the machine will dig deep beneath downtown to help build the 1.7 mile replacement tunnel for the Alaskan Way Viaduct.

The machine itself is currently being constructed in Japan, and when completed will stretch 300 feet long, 57 feet in diameter, and weight 6,700 tons. It will be shipped to Seattle in 41 pieces, and re-assembled here. The mini-tunnel has a series of buttons you can press to check out how it might appear in action. For an in-depth look at the viaduct project and how it’s going to affect your commute, visit the WSDOT.

Curious How the 99 Tunnel Will be constructed? See its Replica in Pioneer Square

Are you curious how that gigantic 99 tunnel is going to be sculpted? Me too! You can now go see the replica for yourself of the machine that is going to dig under downtown Seattle at Milepost 31, the viaduct museum in Pioneer Square. The replica is 10 feet long, making it 1/35th of the massive machine that will arrive in Seattle early next year. According to the Seattle Pi, the machine will dig deep beneath downtown to help build the 1.7 mile replacement tunnel for the Alaskan Way Viaduct.

The machine itself is currently being constructed in Japan, and when completed will stretch 300 feet long, 57 feet in diameter, and weight 6,700 tons. It will be shipped to Seattle in 41 pieces, and re-assembled here. The mini-tunnel has a series of buttons you can press to check out how it might appear in action. For an in-depth look at the viaduct project and how it’s going to affect your commute, visit the WSDOT.

Seattle Gets Stinky: Waste Management Strike Continues

As the waste management strike continues, commercial and residents are starting to feel the effects of the pile up, and so is Seattle’s Waste Management. According to the Seattle Times, Seattle Public Utilities has strong warned Waste Management that if could face very hefty fines if the contractual problems are not resolved by Wednesday afternoon. Fines can reach up to 1.25 million a day if the trash strike continues, and possibly more than that if problems continue throughout King and Snohomish counties. Last week 153 recycling drivers walked off the job as well, due to walk they called unfair labor practices.

SPU has since expressed that if all three waste services are being affected by the strike at the same time (recycle, garbage, and yard waste) and if one particular block has 3 or more containers on the same side of the street not being collected, they will begin issuing fines, and installing consequences. Waste Management has since hired replacement drivers for hospital, nursing homes, and day care pick ups. With the weather heating up, and garbage and waste bins piling high, a stinky city could create hostility from seattleites effected by the strike if an agreement doesn’t begin to to take shape this week. For more information on the strike, visit the Seattle Times.

Seattle Gets Stinky: Waste Management Strike Continues

As the waste management strike continues, commercial and residents are starting to feel the effects of the pile up, and so is Seattle’s Waste Management. According to the Seattle Times, Seattle Public Utilities has strong warned Waste Management that if could face very hefty fines if the contractual problems are not resolved by Wednesday afternoon. Fines can reach up to 1.25 million a day if the trash strike continues, and possibly more than that if problems continue throughout King and Snohomish counties. Last week 153 recycling drivers walked off the job as well, due to walk they called unfair labor practices.

SPU has since expressed that if all three waste services are being affected by the strike at the same time (recycle, garbage, and yard waste) and if one particular block has 3 or more containers on the same side of the street not being collected, they will begin issuing fines, and installing consequences. Waste Management has since hired replacement drivers for hospital, nursing homes, and day care pick ups. With the weather heating up, and garbage and waste bins piling high, a stinky city could create hostility from seattleites effected by the strike if an agreement doesn’t begin to to take shape this week. For more information on the strike, visit the Seattle Times.