Seattle Gets Stinky: Waste Management Strike Continues

As the waste management strike continues, commercial and residents are starting to feel the effects of the pile up, and so is Seattle’s Waste Management. According to the Seattle Times, Seattle Public Utilities has strong warned Waste Management that if could face very hefty fines if the contractual problems are not resolved by Wednesday afternoon. Fines can reach up to 1.25 million a day if the trash strike continues, and possibly more than that if problems continue throughout King and Snohomish counties. Last week 153 recycling drivers walked off the job as well, due to walk they called unfair labor practices.

SPU has since expressed that if all three waste services are being affected by the strike at the same time (recycle, garbage, and yard waste) and if one particular block has 3 or more containers on the same side of the street not being collected, they will begin issuing fines, and installing consequences. Waste Management has since hired replacement drivers for hospital, nursing homes, and day care pick ups. With the weather heating up, and garbage and waste bins piling high, a stinky city could create hostility from seattleites effected by the strike if an agreement doesn’t begin to to take shape this week. For more information on the strike, visit the Seattle Times.

Seattle Gets Stinky: Waste Management Strike Continues

As the waste management strike continues, commercial and residents are starting to feel the effects of the pile up, and so is Seattle’s Waste Management. According to the Seattle Times, Seattle Public Utilities has strong warned Waste Management that if could face very hefty fines if the contractual problems are not resolved by Wednesday afternoon. Fines can reach up to 1.25 million a day if the trash strike continues, and possibly more than that if problems continue throughout King and Snohomish counties. Last week 153 recycling drivers walked off the job as well, due to walk they called unfair labor practices.

SPU has since expressed that if all three waste services are being affected by the strike at the same time (recycle, garbage, and yard waste) and if one particular block has 3 or more containers on the same side of the street not being collected, they will begin issuing fines, and installing consequences. Waste Management has since hired replacement drivers for hospital, nursing homes, and day care pick ups. With the weather heating up, and garbage and waste bins piling high, a stinky city could create hostility from seattleites effected by the strike if an agreement doesn’t begin to to take shape this week. For more information on the strike, visit the Seattle Times.

Garbage Piling Up? Waste Management Strike Affects King County

Did you notice your garbage was still in the driveway when you came home from work yesterday afternoon? You weren’t the only one! The Waste Management Team in King and Snohomish counties went on strike yesterday afternoon against the largest refuse service over wage and benefits issues in the Northwest. According to the Seattle Times, the Local 117, which includes 153 recycling-route drivers walked out yesterday, and were joined by the garbage truck drivers of Local 174 shortly after.

Drivers began to pull service trucks into the South Seattle Waste Management yard, stepped out of their vehicles and picked up a picket sign. Their strike affects over 220,000 in King and Snohomish counties, and Waste Management could be issued steep fines should the strike drag out; up to $4,500 dollars a day for failing to make scheduled collections, and $250,000 if the strike drags out longer than a week. Drivers have been without a contract since May 31st, and are disputing the wage gap between recycle drivers who start at $17 an hour vs garbage drivers who’re starting at around $26 an hour. At this time there are no plans for negotiation in place, Waste Management hopes drivers will come back to work. For more information on the strike, visit the Seattle Times.