Seattle Homes for Rent

If under 2,000 square feet isn’t enough for your next rental, then check out these homes for rent! These homes both have lots of windows to let the much needed sunlight in, and places and spaces to soak it up!

The Highlands

Spacious modern stucco residence in beautiful private setting amongst impressive conifers & magical landscape. Fine teak millwork accentuates the contemporary design & open, rich architecture. Vestibule with round atrium window is a striking venue for art display, and opens into the main floor rooms with floor to ceiling windows. Huge kitchen, five expressive fireplaces, private master suite, lower level with perfect game room & guest suite. Pool, sport court, fountain, just in time for summer!

Available for $9,500
6 bedrooms / 5.25 bathrooms
9,010 square feet

The Highlands: 149 Moss Road NW, Shoreline (MLS# 1088538)

North Capitol Hill

Stunning craftsman on North Capitol Hill. Wood floors and natural daylight throughout. Excellent woodwork, recently renovated kitchen with granite countertops top-of-the line appliances w/east-facing views of Portage Bay. Master bedroom includes fireplace, &luxurious master bath. Lower include separate entrance with second kitchen.

Specific Rental Requirements:

  • All 18 and over applicants must apply
  • Min 750 credit score
  • No co signs
  • 2 car max
  • No negative references
  • No late payments

Available for $6,200

5 bedrooms / 3.5 bathrooms

3,960 square feet

North Capitol Hill: 2818 Broadway E, Seattle (MLS# 1067866)

Seattle Rental Market – 2016 in Review

Seattle RentalThe Seattle rental market has continued to see increasing rents in 2016 over 2015, although as we wrote last month Seattle rents have shown signs of slowing or even going down towards the end of the year.  Seattle rental numbers cannot be gathered from one source.  When looking at the Northwest Multiple Listing Service (NWMLS), the number of rented homes, the average rent, and average rent per square feet in Seattle all went up.  The NWMLS showed 1,094 vs 1,071 Seattle rentals in 2016 and 2015 respectively.  The average rent increased to $2,752 vs $2,588 from the prior year with the average rent per square feet increased to $2.38 from $2.00.  The NWMLS is mainly rentals from individual owners and does not include large Seattle apartment complexes.  In Downtown alone there was 20 new Seattle apartment buildings in 2015, 14 underway or completed in 2016, and 27 dues to be completed in 2017.  Thus the NWMLS is only a small portion of Seattle rentals.

The above picture property is a Seattle rental located on the north-end of the Pike Place Market.  The one bedroom, one bathroom condo has unobstructed views of the Sound, Market, and the Wheel. It is available for $3,675.

Click here to search the NWMLS rental listings or contact a Seattle leasing agent to assist you.

These statistics were gathered from the Northwest Multiple Listing Service, but were not compiled or published by that organization.

1904 Denny Blaine Rental

rental

A sun-filled, perfectly stunning home in picturesque & desirable Denny Blaine. The home was built in 1904 and has been completely remodeled since, featuring an excellent floor plan,  finish work & beautiful windows. The living room with oak floors and large windows on all 3 sides make the home feel bright and refreshing. The home offers a sun room, stately dining room, and an all new kitchen with garden access. The home is family friendly with two excellent playrooms, a guest suite, storage, and mud room. Lush grounds with a sweeping lawn surrounded by roses, lavender, graceful cedars, fig tree, and lilacs. A truly beautiful setting. Available now for $9,750 a month!

Click the link below for more info!

http://www.ewingandclark.com/dennyblainerental

Seattle Ranked Among Highest Rent Paying Cities

for-rent-signIt’s no secret that Seattle is one of the hottest cities in the country for young adults in their 20’s and 30’s and beyond. That’s not surprising information given the influx of tech related jobs with popular companies such as Microsoft, Amazon, Apple, Expedia and many more in and around the area. Add to that a fabulous art and music scene, incredible restaurants driven by award winning chefs and breath taking views, and you’ve got a recipe that has had more young people moving to the Emerald City than ever before.

In spite of  this consistent growth in the city, Seattle has still managed to elude Zillow’s annual Top Ten List of highest rent paying cities in the country,  instead sitting pretty for the last 4 years at #13. That is, until now. Seattle has placed at #10 on the list for 2015, knocking Philadelphia out of a spot it has firmly held on to for the past 4 years. That means that the Big Kahuna of the PNW is up there with the likes of New York, Chicago and Los Angeles, to name just a few.

Perhaps surprisingly for some, the list states that Seattleites paid a whopping $10.2 Billion (yes, you read the right) in rent between November 2014 and November 2015. Couple that with the estimated 20,000 more people who found employment in that time and it starts to make sense, and while it may be easy and even logical to assume the tech boom is responsible for all this, it’s not alone.

Tech companies have experienced a 5 percent increase over the last year, which is nothing to sneeze at, but it’s the construction industry that takes the cake, with an estimated 6.7 percent increase over the last year. Developers in Seattle have been rushing to meet the housing demand of the city (with 10,425 apartment units recently completed or under construction and about a 25 percent increase in apartment inventory over the past three years), but it’s not likely to be quite enough or to help ease rental prices.

“It’s unlikely we’ll see any real rent relief in Seattle any time soon,”  said CEO and co-founder of Cozy Gino Zahnd. “While there’s plenty of new construction, these projects tend to focus on luxury units. Nationwide, we aren’t seeing many new units targeted at middle-income earners.” And though Seattle has plenty of high earners eagerly looking for housing, Zahnd says “Demand will likely remain high, as long as Seattle’s biggest employers continue to expand,” and notes that it’s unlikely we’ve reached a point of saturation, particularly on the high end.

Zahnd also points out that while the construction boom has brought many new jobs to the city, it is unlikely that these construction workers are living in the high-end luxury units they’re building. “Sure people are coming for these construction jobs, but are they living in the luxury high rises they’re building?” he said. “Even with no data, I’m almost certain they are not.”

In any case, with all these new jobs, a housing boom and being ranked among the countries ‘Big Boys’ for the first time, it seems Seattle is finally beginning to be taken seriously as one of the major cities in the country, a fact locals have know for quite some time.

July Update: King County Rental Market

Featured rental: 1375 32nd Ave. S

Featured rental: 1375 32nd Ave. S

King County rental activity was up in July from June with 308 leased properties, according to stats from the Northwest Multiple Listing Service.  This number is down from the same time last year with 332 leased properties in King County.  Currently, there are 342 available King County rentals on the NWMLS, with 81 in neighborhoods within five miles of the downtown Seattle core.  The current highest asking price is $9,500/mo, both for a five-bedroom single-family home in Capitol Hill, and for a two-bedroom condo at the Four Seasons Private Residences in Downtown Seattle.  For more information about Seattle rentals, contact your local real estate agent today!

King County Rental Market: June Recap

Featured rental: 1375 32nd Ave. S

     Featured rental: 1375 32nd Ave. S

King County rental activity was up in June from May with 299 leased properties, according to stats from the Northwest Multiple Listing Service.  This number is down from the same time last year, when there were 324 leased properties in King County.  Currently, there are 283 available King County rentals on the NWMLS, with 74 of those in neighborhoods within five miles of the downtown Seattle core.  The current highest asking price is $10,000 per month for a 2 -bedroom, 2.5-bath condo in the Four Seasons Private Residences in downtown Seattle.  If you are interested in renting in the Seattle area, contact us today!

Rental Market: Vacancy Down, Rent Prices Up

Demand for rental properties in King and Snohomish counties does not seem to be waning, despite average rents having risen 10 percent over the year. Apartment vacancy rates are at their lowest point in at least 10 years, at 4.05 percent, according to Apartment Insights Washington, though in some neighborhoods the rate is much higher. Ballard has the highest vacancy rate in the area at 17.3 percent (though this is down from a vacancy rate of 45 percent for the first quarter of 2015), and as of June 4 there were 600 apartment units under construction in the neighborhood and 450 more permitted, according to the Puget Sound Business Journal. In the King/Snohomish county area as a whole, there are 22,948 rental units under construction, up 42 percent from last year. Predictably, average rent in the King/Snohomish region is highest in Seattle, at $2,226 per month, followed closely by Bellevue, where the average is $2,000 per month. For the region as a whole, the average rent is up to $1,408.

If you are looking for a rental home in the Seattle area, contact your local real estate agent today!

Update On King County’s Rental Market

rentKing County rental activity was hot in the month of May with 269 leased properties, according to stats from the Northwest Multiple Listing Service. The market picks up in the spring and summer, so we can expect the number of rented properties (and rental rates!) to increase in June and into July. This number was up from the same time last year with 244 leased properties in King County. Currently, there are 218 available King County rentals on the NWMLS, 68 of which are within 7 miles of the downtown Seattle core. The current highest asking price is $17,000/mo for a 5-bedroom/6-bathroom single family home in Washington Park. For more information about Seattle rentals, contact your local real estate agent today!

Random Rental Safety Inspections Begin This Month

Apartment KitchenLast year, the city of Seattle implemented the Rental Registration and Inspection Ordinance (RRIO), which requires all Seattle landlords to register their rental properties and have them inspected for basic maintenance compliance, and this month random inspections will begin. While the city has previously relied on renters registering complaints as a way to ensure landlords are performing maintenance, the ordinance aims to establish a system of regular checks on properties to make landlords are adhering to basic standards across all units. The 2009 American Housing Survey reported that an estimated 10 percent of the 148,000 rental units in Seattle had “moderate to severe” physical problems. The new requirements apply to units in both apartment buildings and rental houses.

According to the Puget Sound Business Journal, the Department of Planning and Development is planning to inspect about 2,000 units this year, with a goal of inspecting 6,000 annually going forward. Inspectors won’t be showing up unannounced – landlords will be given 60 days notice to make sure they’re complying with the RRIO checklist, which includes items such as ensuring there is a functioning heat source in every habitable room and bathroom, no leaks in roofs or windows, and making sure all toilets flush. Properties will be inspected at least once every 10 years.

The DPD is hoping the clear guidelines will increase awareness among landlords and rental property owners of what basic standards are for their rental properties, and decrease the reliance on tenant complaints.

If you are interested in renting in the Seattle area, contact your local real estate agent today.

Seattle Rents Up 32% Since 2009

eastlakeccSeattle renters don’t need to be told that housing costs have risen dramatically over the past several years – that reality hits home when they write that rent check every month – but some might be surprised to learn just how far they’ve climbed. Rental rates here are up 32.38 percent since 2009 – more than twice the national average of about 15 percent – while incomes have only grown by 11 percent over the same time period. The only city with a greater increase was New York City, which saw a staggering 50.7 percent spike.

In a press release, NAR Chief Economist Lawrence Yun says that not only are renters feeling the squeeze, but home ownership and its guarantee of set monthly housing costs is becoming further out of reach due to rising home prices and stagnating incomes. Yun suggests that increased new-home construction aimed toward entry-level buyers would help renters transition to home ownership and take pressure off the rental market.

If you are interested in renting in Seattle, contact your local real estate agent today.