Seattle Homes for Rent

If under 2,000 square feet isn’t enough for your next rental, then check out these homes for rent! These homes both have lots of windows to let the much needed sunlight in, and places and spaces to soak it up!

The Highlands

Spacious modern stucco residence in beautiful private setting amongst impressive conifers & magical landscape. Fine teak millwork accentuates the contemporary design & open, rich architecture. Vestibule with round atrium window is a striking venue for art display, and opens into the main floor rooms with floor to ceiling windows. Huge kitchen, five expressive fireplaces, private master suite, lower level with perfect game room & guest suite. Pool, sport court, fountain, just in time for summer!

Available for $9,500
6 bedrooms / 5.25 bathrooms
9,010 square feet

The Highlands: 149 Moss Road NW, Shoreline (MLS# 1088538)

North Capitol Hill

Stunning craftsman on North Capitol Hill. Wood floors and natural daylight throughout. Excellent woodwork, recently renovated kitchen with granite countertops top-of-the line appliances w/east-facing views of Portage Bay. Master bedroom includes fireplace, &luxurious master bath. Lower include separate entrance with second kitchen.

Specific Rental Requirements:

  • All 18 and over applicants must apply
  • Min 750 credit score
  • No co signs
  • 2 car max
  • No negative references
  • No late payments

Available for $6,200

5 bedrooms / 3.5 bathrooms

3,960 square feet

North Capitol Hill: 2818 Broadway E, Seattle (MLS# 1067866)

Featured Rental: 1920’s Broadmoor Home

1212 Broadmoor Dr. ELiving in Broadmoor offers residents the best of two worlds: in-city living within a quiet, secluded atmosphere. Just blocks from the shops and restaurants of Madison Park and Madison Valley, and in walking distance of the Washington Park Arboretum, Broadmoor is the ideal location.

This 1928 home available for rent is situated on the fairway of the Broadmoor Golf Course and offers a peaceful green view. Many of the 1920′s details are still intact, and this home is attractively decorated with pretty oak floors, classic rooms, and a covered porch. A one-car garage and basement offer plenty of storage.

This is a great opportunity to live in one of Seattle’s most sought-after areas! Please contact listing agents Betsy Terry and Jane Powers at Ewing & Clark, Inc. for more information on this home.

The Details

Bedrooms: 3  |  Bathrooms: 1  |  Sq. Ft.: 2,230  | Available for: $3,900/month

Broadmoor Living room

September Rentals Update

ridge downtown rentalSeptember rentals were only slightly lower than August this year in King County. The Northwest Multiple Listing Service data tells us that while there were 287 leased properties in August, September statistics are showing 281. This is only a small change as we enter the fall season. Among these rentals are two luxury penthouses in Bellevue. One of these rentals, a 4-bedroom, 4.25-bathroom penthouse of nearly 4,800 square feet, leased for $17,500 a month. The other luxury penthouse, just as stunning but with 3 bedrooms, 3.5 bathrooms and around 3,500 square feet, leased at a monthly price of $14,900. While these particular luxury rentals are at a distance from Seattle, there were still many other rentals available within the city itself, and all of them in a much lower price range. The NWMLS shows that 19 out of these 281 listings were located in central Seattle and the prices ranged from a low of $1,225/mo to a high of $6,500/mo. The median price for a rental in central Seattle was around $2,200 per month for a 1,200 square foot, 2-bedroom apartment. With this wide range of rental availability and rents slightly lower than summer there still many opportunities to find a King County rental that’s right for you. If you are interested in leasing a property or investing in Seattle or King County properties, please contact an agent today to get information on availability.

August Update: Seattle Rentals

eastlakecc

The last month of summer saw a small drop in rentals in King County this year. According to data found on the Northwest Multiple Listing Service there were 287 leased properties in August of 2015 with the average rental price being just over $4,000/mo. Statistics for King County show a slight decrease in rentals; 334 in August of 2014 compared to this year’s 287. As the number of leased properties dropped, prices for these rentals have steadily increased. The highest rental of the month this year was leased at $9,500/mo for a 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom apartment in the heart of downtown Seattle. Last year, some comparable downtown apartments had been leased for closer to $8,000/mo. For those interested in investing in rental properties it’s a great time to profit on the demands of the increasing rents in the King County rental market. Get in touch with an agent today to find out how you can benefit!

King County Rental Market: June Recap

Featured rental: 1375 32nd Ave. S

     Featured rental: 1375 32nd Ave. S

King County rental activity was up in June from May with 299 leased properties, according to stats from the Northwest Multiple Listing Service.  This number is down from the same time last year, when there were 324 leased properties in King County.  Currently, there are 283 available King County rentals on the NWMLS, with 74 of those in neighborhoods within five miles of the downtown Seattle core.  The current highest asking price is $10,000 per month for a 2 -bedroom, 2.5-bath condo in the Four Seasons Private Residences in downtown Seattle.  If you are interested in renting in the Seattle area, contact us today!

Random Rental Safety Inspections Begin This Month

Apartment KitchenLast year, the city of Seattle implemented the Rental Registration and Inspection Ordinance (RRIO), which requires all Seattle landlords to register their rental properties and have them inspected for basic maintenance compliance, and this month random inspections will begin. While the city has previously relied on renters registering complaints as a way to ensure landlords are performing maintenance, the ordinance aims to establish a system of regular checks on properties to make landlords are adhering to basic standards across all units. The 2009 American Housing Survey reported that an estimated 10 percent of the 148,000 rental units in Seattle had “moderate to severe” physical problems. The new requirements apply to units in both apartment buildings and rental houses.

According to the Puget Sound Business Journal, the Department of Planning and Development is planning to inspect about 2,000 units this year, with a goal of inspecting 6,000 annually going forward. Inspectors won’t be showing up unannounced – landlords will be given 60 days notice to make sure they’re complying with the RRIO checklist, which includes items such as ensuring there is a functioning heat source in every habitable room and bathroom, no leaks in roofs or windows, and making sure all toilets flush. Properties will be inspected at least once every 10 years.

The DPD is hoping the clear guidelines will increase awareness among landlords and rental property owners of what basic standards are for their rental properties, and decrease the reliance on tenant complaints.

If you are interested in renting in the Seattle area, contact your local real estate agent today.

Average Rent In King Co. Up 8% Over Year

belltown rental homeDespite apartment buildings sprouting up all over the city, Seattle’s rental rates seem to be defying the laws of supply and demand. With more than 600 apartment units forecast to hit the market on Capitol Hill alone this year, and 12,000 in the King/Snohomish/Pierce county region, one might expect that an excess of units would cause rents to level off, or even fall. But according to The Seattle Times, the average rent for a one bedroom in King County has risen by 8 percent over the past year to $1,266 per month.

Looking for cheap rent? Move to Seatac, where the average rent for a one-bedroom is a mere $784 per month. Willing to pay top dollar to live in a luxurious high rise? Rent a one-bedroom in Downtown Seattle or South Lake Union for an average of $1,871 per month. Among all Seattle neighborhoods, Ballard saw its rents increase by the highest percentage over the year, having risen 13.1 percent to an average of $1,533, despite the number of available units doubling over the past five years. Magnolia saw the most stability in its rental market, with rents only rising by 1.4 percent. Rents in most of Seattle’s central neighborhoods are hovering around $1,500 per month.

Tom Cain, of research firm Apartments Insights Washington, told The Times that he does not expect rents to fall, in part due to Seattle’s job market keeping demand for apartments extremely high, and also because Seattle’s home-buying market is so challenging right now. A dearth of affordable homes to buy is forcing many to continue renting.

If you are interested in renting in Seattle, contact your local real estate agent today.

 

Rental Caps Set For Micro-Housing Units

rentOn February 23, the Seattle City Council unanimously approved an ordinance to set a cap on rental rates for Small Efficiency Dwelling Units (SEDUs), also known as apodments or micro housing, in an effort to further ensure that affordable units are being included in residential developments. Under provisions of the new bill, in order to receive the 12-year property tax exemptions that come as part of the City of Seattle’s Multifamily Property Tax Exemption Program (MFTE), developers would be required to reserve 25 percent (up from 20 percent under current regulations) of their units for those making no more than 40 percent of the area’s median income. That would set rates at $618 per month for single-person households making $24,720 per year, which is about $400 per month less than current regulations for “affordable” units.

Roger Valdez of Smart Growth Seattle told The Seattle Times that the program’s incentives won’t make up for money developers will lose on the lowered rents, and he predicts many developers will not participate in the program, resulting in zero units of affordable housing. Similarly, according to the Urbanist, Councilmember Kshama Sawant during the legislative session questioned how much affordable housing is actually being created, and whether the program is simply a loophole for developers to avoid property taxes. The bill will act as a sort of “trial run”, as the entire MFTE program could be facing widespread reorganization in the coming year.

If you are interested in renting in the Seattle area, contact your local real estate agent today!

Proposed Bill: 90 Days Notice For Some Rent Increases

housing-marketMost renters have probably experienced it – opening your mailbox to find a notice that your rent is going up. Often, increases come in $50 or $100 increments, but in Seattle’s booming rental market, some are seeing their rents rise by $1,000 or more at a time. Most renters can’t absorb these exorbitant hikes, and Washington State’s Landlord Tenant Law only requires landlords to give 30 days notice for rent changes (60 days in the City of Seattle), giving tenants a short window to find a new home. But according to Crosscut, Washington State Senator Jeanne Kohl-Welles (D-Seattle) is planning to introduce legislation that would require landlords across the board to give 90 days notice if they raise rents by more than 10 percent. The notification period for increases of 10 percent or less would remain at 30 days. For renters who don’t have much cushion in their savings account, this would give them more time to save up enough cash for move-in fees such as first and last months’ rent and a security deposit. According to King-5, the Rental Housing Association of Washington will fight the bill.

Kohl-Welles will also introduce legislation to prohibit landlords from discriminating against potential tenants on the basis of their participation in a government assistance program such as Section 8, which provides rent vouchers for households making 30 percent or less of the area’s median income. The bill would be aimed at landlords who either prohibit those in such a program from applying for housing altogether, or who don’t give them equal consideration with those not enrolled in an assistance program.

If you are interested in renting in the Seattle area, contact your local real estate agent today.

 

Renters In Older Buildings Blindsided By Rent Hikes

rentWith all the talk about record-high rents in the Seattle area, you may look around at the high-rise apartments sprouting up in South Lake Union, Capitol Hill, and Ballard and think you’ve found the culprits for our status as the U.S.’s 8th most expensive city for renters. But here’s a surprising statistic reported recently by Sanjay Bhatt at The Seattle Times: rents in older buildings are actually rising at faster rates than those in newer ones. Rents in buildings built in the 1980’s grew by a rate of 8.4 percent in the fourth quarter of 2014, whereas rents in buildings newer than 2010 grew by only 1.4 percent (granted, rents in these buildings are much higher to start with).

Renters who care little about granite counter tops and rooftop decks have historically been able to rent units for reasonable rates in older buildings that offer function without the flash. But as many of these mid-century buildings approach 60 or 70 years old, they’re being sold off to development groups who pass on renovation costs to tenants in the form of rent hikes. For residents such as those at the Linda Manor Apartments in West Seattle (a building built in 1964), those hikes came in the form of a 130 percent increase, according to The Seattle Times. One resident saw her rent rise from $1,000 per month to $2,300 per month.

With the addition of 86,000 new residents over the past four years and just under 29,000 new units built over the same time period, housing is at a premium and a low vacancy rate in King County is creating stiff competition for renters. Because of that, landlords are having no trouble filling units, even with ever-rising rents.

If you are interested in renting in the Seattle area, contact your local real estate agent today.